[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.120.181. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Citations 0
Letters
February 12, 2003

Consequences of Selling a Kidney in India

Author Affiliations
 

Letters Section Editor: Stephen J. Lurie, MD, PhD, Senior Editor.

JAMA. 2003;289(6):697. doi:10.1001/jama.289.6.697-a

In Reply: In response to Dr Steiner, it is often difficult to identify precisely what is being advocated in the name of organ sale. A kidney exchange program (in which no payment is involved) is entirely different than selling one's organs for money. Steiner cites the statistic that as many as 25% of kidney recipients may return to dialysis. The finding might well be used to argue more strongly against kidney sales. I am also doubtful that being successfully recruited to join a professional football team is analogous to being successfully solicited in an Indian slum to sell one's kidney. Most important, Steiner suggests that "outright kidney selling" might go forward "uncoerced." However, if the "practicalities" are an "insurmountable" issue, then organ sale should be opposed even more steadfastly.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×