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Letters
September 3, 2003

Teaching and Evaluating Students' Professionalism in US Medical Schools, 2002-2003

Author Affiliations
 

Letters Section Editor: Stephen J. Lurie, MD, PhD, Senior Editor.

JAMA. 2003;290(9):1151-1152. doi:10.1001/jama.290.9.1151

To the Editor: In recent decades, medicine's expanded ability to diagnose and treat diseases, coupled with dramatic changes in the financing and delivery of health care, have created many new ethical and professional dilemmas for physicians. Related problems, including financial conflicts of interest, end-of-life decisions, and disclosure of medical errors, are now frequently discussed in both the medical and popular press. In response, there have been growing demands for greater curricular creativity and educational accountability in professionalism education. Herein we report on a survey of US medical schools and their current educational practices and needs in teaching and evaluating professionalism of medical students.

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