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Letters
November 12, 2003

Depression and Health-Related Quality of Life

Author Affiliations
 

Letters Section Editor: Stephen J. Lurie, MD, PhD, Senior Editor.

JAMA. 2003;290(18):2404-2405. doi:10.1001/jama.290.18.2404-a

In Reply: We agree with Dr Katz and colleagues that reciprocity constitutes an additional mechanism through which gifts influence physicians. As they note, the research findings they summarize reinforce several of our points, including the conclusion that even small gifts are influential. Reciprocity is especially important for gift-giving, but the self-serving bias, which was our focus, plays a role in nearly all conflicts of interest that physicians face, such as being paid for referring patients to clinical trials or profiting from procedures that they recommend.

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