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Books, Journals, New Media
June 2, 2004

Occupational Health

Author Affiliations
 

Books, Journals, New Media Section Editor: Harriet S. Meyer, MD, Contributing Editor, JAMA; David H. Morse, MS, University of Southern California, Norris Medical Library, Journal Review Editor.

JAMA. 2004;291(21):2647-2648. doi:10.1001/jama.291.21.2647

Occupational hazards and poor working conditions, which have largely been well controlled in developed countries, remain prevalent in developing countries. Globalization may result in further threats to the health of workers in developing countries through transfer of hazardous industries. Furthermore, social inequalities resulting from work activity can affect the health of both the individual and the family.

While much has been written about the impact of work on the health of the individual worker, Global Inequalities at Work is probably one of the first books to examine the impact of work on health of families and societies in different parts of the world.

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