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JAMA 100 Years Ago
July 14, 2004

HOW THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER SHOULD TREAT GONORRHEA.

Author Affiliations
 

JAMA 100 Years Ago Section Editor: Jennifer Reiling, Assistant Editor.

JAMA. 2004;292(2):281. doi:10.1001/jama.292.2.281

FERD. C. VALENTINE, M.D.
AND
TERRY M. TOWNSEND, M.D.
NEW YORK CITY.

To the captious, the title of this paper may appear an arraignment of the brain and brawn of the medical profession. In a measure, it will so apply in some instances. It seems time to inveigh against the otherwise excellent practitioners who do not treat gonorrhea. In refusing to give these cases the care needed, they not only neglect one of the physician's most precious privileges—the prevention of disease, but are derelict in the performance of a duty. Some practitioners base their unwillingness to treat this disease on the ground of its danger to other patients. But even those much engaged in obstetric work, as a part of general practice, can very well protect their parturient patients against infection. The fact that no modern worker will attend a labor case without observing all minutiæ of antiseptic and aseptic precautions, is in itself adequate protection for his non-infected patients.

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