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Books, Journals, New Media
October 6, 2004

Medical Sociology

Author Affiliations
 

Books, Journals, New Media Section Editor: Harriet S. Meyer, MD, Contributing Editor, JAMA ; David H. Morse, MS, University of Southern California, Norris Medical Library, Journal Review Editor.

JAMA. 2004;292(13):1615-1621. doi:10.1001/jama.292.13.1619

“Medicine has many faces. Whatever your interests and talents are, there is a place for you to express them in this profession”: Samuel Bloom remembers that statement from a lecture he heard nearly 50 years ago at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. At the time, Bloom was a graduate student at Columbia University assisting in a study of medical education. He believed the statement applied to him as well, since he was embarking on a career in the new field of medical sociology. Bloom spent most of what was to become a distinguished academic career at Baylor University School of Medicine in Houston, Tex, and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and City University of New York in New York City. He witnessed much of medical sociology’s early growth and institutionalization after World War II, and his personal papers constitute part of the basis for his history of the subdiscipline.

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