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Editorial
November 17, 2004

Developmental Vulnerability and Resilience in Extremely Preterm Infants

Author Affiliations
 

Author Affiliation: Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.

JAMA. 2004;292(19):2399-2401. doi:10.1001/jama.292.19.2399

During the past 3 decades, major advances in maternal-fetal medicine, neonatology, and translational developmental biology have resulted in survival rates greater than 90% among the approximately 50 000 infants born annually with birth weights between 1000 g (2.2 lb) and 1500 g (3.5 lb).1 In addition, combinations of maternal and neonatal transport to specialized hospitals, use of prenatal maternal corticosteroids, and enhanced collaboration between obstetricians and neonatologists have resulted in survival rates greater than 70% for the approximately 10 000 infants born annually with birth weights between 500 and 999 g.25 While there has been success in improving survival among low-birth-weight infants, preventing the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants (weighing 401-1000 g at birth) remains a major challenge.

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