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Commentary
August 16, 2006

Scale-up of Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing in Kenya

Author Affiliations
 

Author Affiliations: US Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Global AIDS Program, Nairobi, Kenya (Dr Marum); Liverpool Voluntary Counseling and Testing and Care, Nairobi, Kenya, and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, England (Dr Taegtmeyer); and National AIDS and STD Control Programme, Nairobi, Kenya (Dr Chebet). Dr Chebet is now with the Johns Hopkins Program for International Education on Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nairobi, Kenya.

JAMA. 2006;296(7):859-862. doi:10.1001/jama.296.7.859

Overburdened health care systems in resource-poor countries are unable to cope with the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the increased responses to treatment that have been proposed internationally. There is an urgent need for robust, replicable approaches that meet the need for rapid expansion of HIV testing services. Provision and utilization of voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) services in Kenya expanded rapidly between 2000 and 2005. Lessons learned from increasing access to VCT are applicable to global efforts to increase access to HIV prevention, care, and antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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