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Letters
March 14, 2007

Association Between Rates of HIV Testing and Elimination of Written Consents in San Francisco

Author Affiliations
 

Letters Section Editor: Robert M. Golub, MD, Senior Editor.

JAMA. 2007;297(10):1057-1062. doi:10.1001/jama.297.10.1061

To the Editor: Twenty years after the licensing of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test, an estimated 252 000 to 312 000 US residents are unaware that they are infected with HIV.1 To increase the number of infected persons who are aware of their status and can therefore benefit from treatment, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended making HIV testing a routine part of medical care.2 The new CDC testing guidelines specifically advise against using a separate written consent form for HIV tests. Whether elimination of the requirement for written consent will increase testing is not known.

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