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Article
August 20, 1910

A CLAMP FOR ISOLATING A PORTION OF THE LUMEN OF A BLOOD-VESSEL WITHOUT STOPPING THE CIRCULATION THROUGH THE VESSEL

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND, O.

From the H. K. Cushing Laboratory of Experimental Medicine. Western Reserve University.

JAMA. 1910;55(8):647-649. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330080013007

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Abstract

For various purposes in physiology and also in surgery it may be desirable to clamp off temporarily a longitudinal portion at one side of a blood-vessel while the circulation is allowed to go on through the remainder of the lumen. A field can thus be provided in which the operator can work at his leisure without fear of injuring the organs supplied or drained by the vessel by clamping it off altogether. I have devised a clamp by which this can be conveniently done. One form of it is shown in the accompanying illustrations.

The essential points are the following:

1. The long, narrow grip of the jaws in the longitudinal direction. The grip is narrow in order that as little as possible of the lumen may be encroached on. The length of the occluded portion will, of course, vary with the purpose for which the clamp is used.

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