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October 1, 1910

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1910;55(14):1204-1205. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330140048019
Abstract

"ARSENO-BENZOL"—"606"—"ARSEN-PHENOL-AMIN"  The intense interest shown in the new remedy, "arsenobenzol," for the treatment of syphilis—Ehrlich and Hata's "606"—as well as a revival of interest in the use of sodium cacodylate as shown by A. Heym,1 and more recently by J. B. Murphy,2 makes opportune a discussion of the chemical structure of "606," sodium cacodylate and of atoxyl and its acetyl derivative, arsacetin. Sodium cacodylate is the sodium salt of cacodylic or dimethyl-arsenic acid, which differs from arsenic acid by replacement of two hydroxyl groups by two methyl groups. Thus:Sodium cacodylate, as described in New and Nonofficial Remedies, is a relatively permanent salt of arsenic acid quite soluble in water and faintly alkaline towards litmus but neutral toward phenolphthalein. Atoxyl is sodium arsanilate, the sodium salt of arsanilic acid. Arsanilic acid differs from arsenic acid in that one hydroxyl group of the arsenic acid is replaced by an amino-benzene

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