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Article
November 19, 1910

INFLUENCE OF PERIGASTRIC LESIONS ON GASTRIC SECRETIONSSTUDY BASED ON CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS

JAMA. 1910;55(21):1799-1803. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330210027008
Abstract

A few years ago I was impressed with the extraordinary frequency with which I met patients who had gastric hyperacidity with their gastric symptoms. Many of them were of a neurotic type and could possibly have been diagnosed and dismissed as cases of nervous dyspepsia with hyperacidity. But a great many others, eventually and often surprisingly, gave positive symptoms and physical signs pointing to disease of other organs near the stomach, which, no doubt, influenced the gastric secretions and made the diagnosis of nervous dyspepsia unwarranted. In a discussion of this matter with my brother, Dr. J. A. Lichty, of Pittsburg, I found that he had the same experience. On account of the belief that the very frequent diagnosis of dyspepsia with hyperacidity was often unwarranted, we decided to investigate the subject more minutely, both from clinical observations and by experiments on animals.

SUMMARY OF CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS  In a review

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