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Article
November 26, 1910

ARTHRITIS OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL ORIGIN, ITS DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

JAMA. 1910;55(22):1871-1877. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330220015008
Abstract

An obscure relationship between disorders of the digestive tract and joint affections has long been recognized by clinicians, and in the last decade some of these relations have become better understood. It is now known that severe cases of arthritis may occasionally be completely relieved by preventing absorption of intestinal contents in the large intestine. This may be accomplished by intestinal lavage, purging, regulation of diet, and by operations on the colon that cause fecal material to be discharged through artificial openings, thus putting the lower portion of the intestine entirely out of function.

Various intestinal affections may influence joints, and it is interesting to observe that typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery both are occasionally accompanied by joint lesions, while in appendicitis arthritic complications are too infrequent to seem more than mere coincidences. The few scattering cases of arthritis that occur with rarer diseases of the alimentary tract will be

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