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Article
December 3, 1910

MYIASIS DERMATOSA DUE TO THE OXWARBLE FLIES

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURG, PA.

JAMA. 1910;55(23):1978-1979. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.04330230036011
Abstract

Myiasis dermatosa, or infection of the skin with the larval stage of dipterous insects, is fairly common in the tropics though less so in temperate zones, the infection in man most commonly being due to the screw-worm (Compsomyia macellaria2) or to Dermatobia hominis.3 The following case of human infection due to Hypoderma lineata, one of the ox-warble flies and a parasite of cattle almost exclusively, merits report because of its rarity.

Patient.—  H. S., a white boy, aged 11, of Roanoke, Va., was admitted to Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, March 13, 1908, complaining of "swelling under the chin." His family and personal history are negative.

Present Illness.—  In December, 1907, the boy noticed a small round lump just below the left knee; this lump was slightly red and very tender especially at night. About two days later the lump had disappeared from the original position and was found

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