[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 18, 1913

THE DIAGNOSIS OF GALL-STONE LODGED IN THE COMMON DUCT

Author Affiliations

Clinical Professor of Medicine, Leland Stanford Junior University, Department of Medicine SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1913;60(3):171-172. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340030001001
Abstract

A gall-stone is apparently a small and insignificant object; yet it is frequently sufficient, as in the case about to be reported, to account for a long, painful and incapacitating illness. This particular stone, removed from The patient's body, marks the difference between previous months of invalidism and present good health.

Clinical History.  —The patient, a woman aged 40, was first seen at Lane Hospital Oct. 7, 1912. She had always been fairly well except for occasional attacks of malaria until seven years before, when she began to have attacks of pain the upper abdomen, ultimately recognized as due to gall-stones. After suffering from these for four years she was finally operated on at her home in Louisiana. She was told afterward that approximately 300 stones were removed, that there was a liver abscess and that gall-stones were found imbedded in the liver. Four weeks after operation she passed gall-stones

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×