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Article
January 18, 1913

ANOMALOUS INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE IN OPERATIONS ON TONSILS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Instructor in Surgery and in Anatomy, University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1913;60(3):172-173. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340030002002
Abstract

In view of the increasing number of operations on the tonsil because of the focusing of medical eyes on it as a primary source of metastatic infections, because of the discovery of more cases in the systematic inspection of schoolchildren, and because of the popularity of complete ablation of the tonsil in preference to partial tonsillectomy, a timely note of warning should be sounded of the liability of serious if not fatal hemorrhage from wounding a loop of an anomalous internal carotid artery. The following specimen, found in the Anatomical Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania, serves as a striking example of this:

Anomalous Sigmoid Tortuosity of Cervical Portion of Internal Carotid Artery.  —Specimen consists of left side of skull containing the internal carotid artery in situ and dissected free from surrounding tissues. The artery is of uniform caliber throughout its length, and its walls neither thickened nor calcareous. Beginning

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