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Article
March 15, 1913

AN ANALYSIS OF FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX CEREBROSPINAL FLUIDS FROM VARIOUS PATHOLOGIC CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

Pathologist to the Jewish Hospital; Assistant to the Chair of Medicine in the University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College; Associate Pathologist to the Jewish Hospital; Pathologist to the Pilcher Private Hospital BROOKLYN

From the Laboratory of the Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn.

JAMA. 1913;60(11):811-813. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340110017006

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Abstract

The use of the fluid contained in the cerebrospinal canal for the purposes of aid in diagnosis presents additional evidence of the tendency of modern medicine. Advantage is taken of all possible available means for clearing up the many obscure conditions which still constitute the bulk of the science and which have baffled the diagnostic skill of the physician from the earliest time to the present day. If any branch of medicine is in need of aid in diagnosis, that devoted to the study of diseases referable to the cerebrospinal tract is certainly the one.

It is to be borne in mind, and special emphasis is laid on the fact, that the signs and symptoms manifested by the cerebrospinal tract in the course of disease do not necessarily mean disease of this part of the body any more than the bleeding from the nose in typhoid represents local disease, bronchitis

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