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Article
March 15, 1913

SOME FEATURES OF THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE DURING THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

Author Affiliations

BENNINGTON, VT.

JAMA. 1913;60(11):814-820. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340110020008
Abstract

THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE  So much for the state of science and the theory of medicine in the early part of the seventeenth century. In regard to the practice of medicine at that period we must depend partly on indirect and collateral, rather than on direct and immediate, testimony. We must step a little aside and view it through other lenses. And the seventeenth-century literature gives us a large and harmonious idea of the usual and current conduct of medicine, for in addition to its scientific development, it produced some of the greatest names in the literature of the world, Shakespeare and Burton, Sarpi and Bacon, Sir Thomas Browne and Milton, Corneille and Racine, Molière and Cervantes. Still as one must go to Aristophanes for a picture of Athenian morals and customs during his period, so it is in Molière and Lesage that one finds the truest pictures of contemporary

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