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Article
March 22, 1913

STERILIZATION, BOILING AND PASTEURIZATION OF MILK

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School; Associate Visiting Physician at the Children's Hospital and at the Infants' Hospital BOSTON

JAMA. 1913;60(12):875-878. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340120001001
Abstract

The term, "sterilization," should never be applied to the processes used in the preparation of milk for the feeding of infants, because the milk is never rendered bacteriologically sterile by them. The term, "pasteurization," as it is ordinarily used, is indefinite and misleading. It should always be stated at what temperature the milk is heated and how long it is kept at this temperature; otherwise, it means nothing.

THE CHANGES PRODUCED IN MILK BY HEAT 

Appearance, Taste and Smell  A well-marked scum, or pellicle, develops on the surface of boiled milk. This may begin to develop at as low a temperature as 122 F. (50 C.) (Pfaundler and Schlossmann).1 This is due to the disassociation of the casein compounds as the result of drying. Its composition is:Fatty matter... 45.42 per cent. Casein and albuminoid... 50.86 per cent. Ash... 3.72 per cent. (Rosenau).2Changes in the taste and

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