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Article
March 22, 1913

SOME FEATURES OF THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE DURING THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

Author Affiliations

BENNINGTON, VT.

JAMA. 1913;60(12):884-887. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04340120010004
Abstract

(Concluded from page 820)

HARVEY AND SYDENHAM  Of the theory itself of the circulation I shall not have to speak in detail. The children of to-day in the intermediate grades of the public schools know better than the great teachers of anatomy whom I have mentioned the course of the blood from the left ventricle through the arteries, capillaries and veins back in a circle to the right ventricle and through the lungs. Indeed, they know it better than Harvey himself knew it, for even to him a complete demonstration was denied, since it was not until 1661 that Malpighi observed with a microscope the passage of the blood through the capillaries, whose continuity with the arteries and veins Marchetti finally proved by injecting them. Harvey affirmed his conviction that such a communication must exist, but it was on this ultimate demonstration that his discovery finally rested.The effect of

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