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August 16, 1913

REST AND REPAIR IN PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

PRESCOTT, ARIZ.

JAMA. 1913;61(7):466-470. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350070020006
Abstract

More than fifty years ago Mr. John Hilton,1 a prominent English surgeon, drew the attention of the profession to the marked value of physiologic and mechanical rest as a therapeutic agent in the cure of accidents and surgical diseases. In a series of masterly addresses delivered in London before the Royal College of Surgeons, Mr. Hilton described ''the marvellous contrivances which Nature has employed for securing rest to the different organs of the body when in health," and ''the instinctive promptings of Nature to secure rest on the occurrence of accidents or diseases."

Mr. Hilton says:

"So intimate is the association between rest and growth as to make them appear on a superficial view to stand to each other in relation of cause and effect. Accurate observation of the animal and vegetable world certainly reveals their perpetual coexistence; and growth as a rule seems pari passu with physiological rest.''

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