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Article
September 27, 1913

Current Comment

JAMA. 1913;61(13_part_1):1050-1052. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350130044016
Abstract

A LAYMAN'S ADVICE ON ORGANIZATION METHODS  Suggestions of value to our medical societies can often be obtained from civic organizations. In a recent issue of Suburban Life Mr. H. J. Howland entertainingly and instructively recites his experiences as president of the Civic Association of Montclair, N. J. "The point," Mr. Howland says, "is to begin with something definite and not too hard, something that needs not discussion but doing. If you have a civic association or improvement society [or, he might have added, a medical society] there is one thing you must avoid like the plague—the adopting of resolutions. The resolution habit is worse than drink, worse than the opium habit. In my brief and inglorious career I put many resolutions to vote, saw them adopted with enthusiasm, and then decorously interred in the archives until I shuddered at the thought that New Year's Day was coming. Do not pass

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