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Article
October 4, 1913

THE CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF HIGH AND LOW PULSE-PRESSURES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CARDIAC LOAD AND OVERLOAD

Author Affiliations

TOLEDO, OHIO

JAMA. 1913;61(14):1256-1259. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350150012005
Abstract

METHOD AND PURPOSE OF STUDY  The attempt has been made, in an analysis of comparative pulse-pressure observations in 170 persons, to determine what, if any, clinical significance was to be attached to certain high and low auscultatory readings. For convenience of classification, the patients have been grouped as in the accompanying tabulation:Number of PatientsConditions Studied1. Normal circulatory conditions........612. Acute infections ....................263. Arterial hypotension ................ 94. Arterial hypertension ...............515. Myocardial and valvular lesions:(a) With compensation ........... 9(b) With decompensation ..........14The readings were taken as follows: With the patient at rest, compression was made with a 12 cm. arm-band and the systolic pressure taken by palpation. The compression was then released and, after an interval sufficient for reestablishment of the circulation in the arm, the stethoscope was lightly applied over the brachial artery below the arm-band. Compression was reapplied and the systolic pressure taken by auscultation. The

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