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Article
October 4, 1913

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1913;61(14):1298-1300. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350150054021
Abstract

THE EFFECT OF FOOD ON METABOLISM  Under ordinary conditions of life, and in the absence of modifying pathologic factors like fever, metabolism may be increased by two prominent causes. One of these is muscular activity, which is also commonly referred to by the terms "work" and "exercise." The other factor is the ingestion of food. Extremes of external temperature are, of course, also not without influence on metabolism; but in every-day experience they are modified or counteracted by numerous environmental agencies, such as variations in clothing, etc., so that this element in the forces which play on the energy transformations in our bodies will here be left out of consideration.The heightened metabolism following the intake of food is not characteristic of any group of foodstuffs in particular, but is evoked by proteins, fats and carbohydrates, though in widely different degrees. It is greatest in the case of proteins. Why

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