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October 11, 1913

FUNCTIONAL TEST (PHENOLSULPHONEPHTHALEIN) OF THE KIDNEY IN SCARLET FEVER

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Durand Hospital of the Memorial Institute for Infectious Diseases, Chicago.

JAMA. 1913;61(15):1368-1370. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350160030008
Abstract

Rowntree and Geraghty1 in 1910 introduced phenolsulphonephthalein tests as a method of determining the functional ability of the kidney. They found on subcutaneous injection of the dye that in normal persons from 40 to 60 per cent. is excreted after one hour and from 20 to 25 per cent. after two hours. They found that in acute nephritis the activity of the kidneys may fluctuate greatly in twenty-four to forty-eight hours. In parenchymatous nephritis there is a marked decrease in the amount of drug excreted and in chronic interstitial nephritis a low output was found in all cases. Later they2 showed that the test is of value in that by showing a marked decrease in renal function, it indicates impending uremia when other signs are lacking. They conclude that intramuscular injections are better than subcutaneous. This work has been confirmed by Boyd,3 who examined a large series

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