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Article
November 1, 1913

STUDY OF A CASE OF CONGENITAL HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Medicine, University of Minnesota; Instructor in Pathology, University of Minnesota MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1913;61(18):1586-1591. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350190004002
Abstract

The entire subject of hemolytic jaundice is to-day one of especial interest not only because of the rarity of the condition and its important bearing on obscure diseases of the blood and spleen, but also on account of the scant attention which it has received in text-books on medicine and the few articles concerning it which have appeared in this country. Notable exceptions to this latter statement are the excellent contributions by Tileston and Griffin1 and Thayer and Morris,2 in both of which personal observations on cases are reported and the history of the disease with its characteristic features ably discussed.

The term "congenital hemolytic jaundice" is applied to a rare condition of unknown etiology, characterized by a chronic non-obstructive jaundice, splenomegaly, urobilinuria, and an anemia, which, dependent on hemolysis, shows, on the one hand, evidence of marked destruction of the red blood-cells and, on the other, signs

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