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Article
November 1, 1913

AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE ANTISEPTIC VALUE IN THE URINE OF THE INTERNAL USE OF HEXAMETHYLENAMIN

Author Affiliations

Assistant Resident Surgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital BALTIMORE

JAMA. 1913;61(18):1601-1605. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350190019006
Abstract

Since 1895, when Nicolaier1 first demonstrated formaldehyd in the urine as a decomposition product of hexamethylenamin, the use of hexamethylenamin as a urinary antiseptic has been almost universal. Churchman2 indicated in 1906 its antiseptic value with the conclusion that its effects in the urine are expressed in an inhibition of bacterial development rather than in a destruction of bacterial life. Nothing more definite appeared until last year, when Burnam3 upset our ideas somewhat by stating that on the customary doses of from 5 to 10 grains three times a day not more than two patients out of ten would show any decomposition of the drug into formaldehyd at all, while only 60 per cent. would show it on a dosage of from 20 to 30 grains every four hours. These findings were quickly confirmed by L'Esperance4 and Jenness,5 the former finding 52 per cent. formaldehyd-containing

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