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Article
November 1, 1913

CORRECTION OF IMPEDIMENTS OF SPEECH IN OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE, WIS.

JAMA. 1913;61(18):1610-1613. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350190028008
Abstract

There is no common ailment which I believe has received less consideration at the hands of the medical profession than that of stammering. The subject was given but small consideration up to the beginning of the nineteenth century, at which time it was seriously studied by Arnott, Columbat, and Schulthers. A little later came the period of surgical enthusiasm, originated by the work of Diffenbach. Through the efforts of Kussmaul, Gutsmann, and Wyllie the knowledge of the subject was placed on a sound scientific basis. Perhaps the most exhaustive study ever given the subject was by our own noted scientist, Prof. Alexander Melville Bell. To-day the question is kept alive by a limited number of men, foremost among whom may be mentioned Dr. G. Hudson-Makuen of Philadelphia and Dr. E. W. Scripture of Columbia University.

The medical profession as a whole, however, has never given the subject the serious study

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