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Article
January 26, 1918

A Handbook on Antiseptics.

Author Affiliations
 

By Henry Drysdale Dakin, D.Sc., F.I.C., F.R.S., and Edward Kellogg Dunham, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Pathology, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. Cloth. Price, $1.25. Pp. 129. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1917.

JAMA. 1918;70(4):261. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600040059027

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Abstract

This little book presents in a convenient form the methods of preparation and use of antiseptics that have received endorsement by military surgeons during the present war. While the phenolic group, the heavy metals, the dyes and other agents, such as hydrogen peroxid, iodin, boric acid and alcohol, are discussed, the members of the chlorin group, such as salts of hypochlorous acid and the chloramins, on which the authors have done a large amount of research work, have, as might be expected, received the preponderance of attention; and a perusal of the book leaves one with the impression that chlorin is king of disinfectants, which it well might be. Should the reader look for a discussion of the practical details of use of these agents by the Carrel method, he would be disappointed, as the authors have not taken up surgical technic. In the chapter devoted to methods of testing

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