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Article
February 9, 1918

PREGNANCY AND PULMONARY TUBERCULOSISWITH A REPORT OF ONE HUNDRED AND THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1918;70(6):362-365. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600060008003
Abstract

The incidence of pregnancy and tuberculosis is a frequent one. In 1913, Bacon estimated that 32,000 tuberculous women become pregnant annually in the United States, and added that between 44,000 and 48,000 women of the child-bearing age die of tuberculosis every year.

Among those who see much of pulmonary tuberculosis, it is a well recognized fact that, among women, this disease not uncommonly first manifests itself during pregnancy or shortly after the birth of the child. Why a tuberculous process should become active during pregnancy is not altogether clear, unless it can be ascribed to an added strain on the woman's resistance. In the cases following confinement, the violent exertion that characterizes many labors is commonly accepted as the probable cause of arousing to activity a latent lesion, the exertion under these circumstances being as harmful as mountain climbing or other forms of violent effort. Whether it is coincidence or

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