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Article
March 2, 1918

URINARY ANTISEPSISA STUDY OF THE ANTISEPTIC PROPERTIES AND THE RENAL EXCRETION OF COMPOUNDS RELATED TO PHENOLSULPHONEPHTHALEIN: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Resident Urologist, Johns Hopkins Hospital BALTIMORE

From the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1918;70(9):581-585. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600090001001
Abstract

The ideal internal urinary antiseptic must be a drug which is chemically stable, nontoxic, and nonirritating to the lower urinary tract; which is antiseptic in high dilution (in urine, as well as in water), and which is eliminated unchanged in high percentage by the kidney. There is no such drug known. A consideration of the properties possessed by phenolsulphonephthalein, however, shows that this compound comes very close to filling all these requirements. Phenolsulphonephthalein is chemically stable, nontoxic and nonirritating, and is eliminated by the kidney with incredible rapidity and completeness; but it has no antiseptic properties, excepting in water in its free acid form. (Clinically it is used as the monosodium salt.) This remarkable compound, synthesized in 1898 by Sohon,1 at Remsen's2 suggestion, investigated later in Abel's3 laboratory, and introduced into clinical use by Rowntree and Geraghty4 twelve years later, has become the basis of the

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