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Article
May 11, 1918

OPERATIVE TREATMENT IN SELECTED CASES OF CHRONIC PERIPHERAL FACIAL PARALYSIS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurological Surgery, New York Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1918;70(19):1354-1357. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600190010004
Abstract

Not only is the condition of facial paralysis, especially of the peripheral type, a most noticeable deformity, but the resulting contractures in chronic cases frequently impair the speech, mastication and deglutition; inability to close the homolateral eye permits a chronic conjunctivitis to result, and if palpebral contractures occur, then an eversion of the eyelids is a common sequela. In addition to these definite objective impairments resulting from persistent facial paralysis, it should be remembered that the subjective reaction of such a deformity on the patient is very marked—so much so that few patients having a complete facial paralysis persisting over a period of two years and longer show a normal reaction emotionally. They are easily depressed, and they limit their lives more and more to one of seclusion; particularly is this true of women.

Facial paralysis may be considered of the peripheral type when the lesion exists at the facial

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