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Article
May 18, 1918

THE ATROPIN TEST IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF TYPHOID INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

Chiefs of Medical and of Laboratory Service, Respectively, Base Hospital CAMP SHERMAN, CHILLICOTHE, OHIO

JAMA. 1918;70(20):1435-1438. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600200001001
Abstract

With all appreciation of the minimizing effect of typhoid-paratyphoid prophylaxis on typhoid infections in army camps, it is still reasonable to anticipate the occurrence of occasional camp cases. The larger number of such cases will probably arise from among unvaccinated civilian workmen and from the improperly vaccinated soldier. In typhoid infections appearing in persons who have received typhoid prophylaxis completely or incompletely, the disease will usually be characterized by such mildness as not to present the outstanding features of typhoid that so readily permit a diagnosis among the unvaccinated. Facing this difficulty in the recognition of typhoid existence, those medical officers responsible for the prevention of infectious diseases in army camps, and those on whom will devolve the care and treatment of suspected cases, are evaluating all recent developments purporting to be of additional diagnostic aid. At a similar period in the making of the British Army there came into

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