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Article
June 22, 1918

THE EARLY HISTORY OF BACTERIOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1918;70(25):1946-1947. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600250046012
Abstract

Whenever we are charged, as a nation, with being occupied solely with the life of trade, and the designation of Yankee is used to designate preeminently commercial habits, it is refreshing to turn to the history of science for the truth. Of course, in the earlier days of the United States as a national enterprise the conditions were scarcely favorable for the widespread prosecution of those studies for which the European peoples of the civilized world had been prepared by generations and even centuries of experience. America's intellectual life can at best be measured by decades. How has she progressed in some of the more recently recognized intellectual diciplines? The new science of bacteriology, the outcome of the labors of Pasteur, Lister, Koch and others, was born within the memory of many that are still living. The bacillus of tuberculosis was announced in 1882; the vibrio of Asiatic cholera in

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