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August 3, 1918

MEDICAL SERVICE IN THE CONSERVATION OF INDUSTRIAL MAN POWER

Author Affiliations

Industrial Hygienist (by Temporary Appointment) U. S. Public Health Service TOLEDO, OHIO

JAMA. 1918;71(5):333-336. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600310011004
Abstract

It must be realized that a decisive victory can not be gained by the Allies until the resources of the United States in men and supplies are made available for that purpose.

Our national war problems are (1) to mobilize and train for military purposes approximately 5,000,000 men, (2) to manufacture the supplies necessary to provide them with facilities for fighting, and (3) to transport men and supplies to France quickly and safely.

The production and transportation of supplies enough to maintain a fighting force of 5,000,000 men, it is estimated, will require the work of at least 25,000,000 people in the mines and on the farms, in the factories and on the railroads and the ships. This means a tremendous industrial expansion. It has already begun. Small factories have become large establishments, and rural communities have become centers of industry.

CONDITIONS OF INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION  Labor was not prepared to

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