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Article
August 3, 1918

LUMBAR PUNCTURE IN MENINGEAL HEMORRHAGE OF THE NEW-BORN

Author Affiliations

Physician in Chief, St. Ann's Infant Asylum ST. LOUIS

JAMA. 1918;71(5):347-349. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600310025007
Abstract

Hemorrhage of the brain in the newly born is by no means a seldom accident. It has been stated that this is the etiologic factor in one third of stillbirths. It follows in all varieties of deliveries; even spontaneous, easy deliveries are not free from this danger. This condition, first properly interpreted by Sarah McNutt, in 1885, forms one of the darkest chapters in pediatric medicine. More than thirty years before Little had described the spasticity of the muscles and the idiocy following the lesion and recognized its relation to long and protracted labors. While the majority of the infants soaffected do not survive the birth act, a large group live several days, the first few hours not offering the slightest suspicion of the fatal outcome which is soon to follow. The group that survives and is able to weather the cerebral compression is only too well known to all

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