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Article
August 17, 1918

SYSTEMIC MANIFESTATIONS OF CHRONIC NASAL SINUS INFECTION IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY, IOWA

From the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, State University of Iowa.

JAMA. 1918;71(7):511-514. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600330009004
Abstract

The part that acute and chronic respiratory infection plays in the immediate health and welfare of the infant and the child has been generally appreciated in the medical profession. Clinical experience has taught that the tonsils and adenoids are to be regarded as the primary loci of infecting micro-organisms, and there have grown up terms such as the tonsillar or rheumatic syndrome, and the like. It has been understood that from these primary loci infection travels either by continuity or by invasion into the body itself, and that other more distant affections are now regarded, if not directly caused by these primary troubles, as at least standing in close etiologic connection with them. However, a certain note of dissatisfaction is unmistakable, especially as evidenced in the discussion held in this section two years ago as to the possibility of overemphasizing the importance of these locations. This dissatisfaction is based in

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