[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 5, 1918

THE DEFENSE OF CORN AS A WAR TIME FOOD

JAMA. 1918;71(14):1138-1139. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600400038013
Abstract

The United States Food Administration, as we have pointed out, has been particularly careful to fortify its pronouncements and dietary admonitions by reference to the judgment of scientific experts, and has frankly stated that so far as nutritional value is concerned it makes practically no difference whether we eat wheat or oats, rye or barley. Wheat flour, which people are asked to conserve, has just one advantage over the other cereals: it can be made into lighter and more durable bread.

Since our entry into the war, corn has become the most important and popular substitutive cereal. The mill products of maize are rapidly obtaining vogue in the nutrition of large numbers of our population. The value of dependable information is thus manifoldly emphasized. It may rightly be admitted that the maize kernel, by itself, is by no means an adequate or complete food. If we except milk, few individual

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×