[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 12, 1918

FURTHER EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SURGICAL SHOCK

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

JAMA. 1918;71(15):1184-1188. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600410006002
Abstract

A review of the results obtained in the extensive amount of work that has been done on the problem of shock, both experimentally and clinically, makes the point I have repeatedly emphasized particularly clear, namely, that the condition the surgeon calls shock may be due to a variety of causes.1 The variation in the primary etiologic factor in a condition in which identical clinical symptoms occur is probably the cause of the more or less contradictory conclusions arrived at by investigators, both experimentally and clinically.

The value of experimental work on surgical shock is certainly decreased by the fact that it is impossible to reproduce the experimental environment, and the condition itself, in a manner identical to its clinical manifestation. From the results of a large series of experiments I am forced to conclude that the experimental investigator approaches, in only a few specific types, the condition that the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×