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Article
November 9, 1918

TWO CASES OF HUMAN ANTHRAX AT CAMP JACKSON

Author Affiliations

(Chicago) Captain, M. C., U. S. Army CAMP JACKSON, COLUMBIA, S. C.

From the laboratory of the Base Hospital, Camp Jackson, Marshall A. Barber, Captain, S. C., U. S. Army, Chief of Laboratory.

JAMA. 1918;71(19):1571-1572. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020450018011f

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Abstract

Anthrax, a disease of relatively rare occurrence in civil life in this country, has assumed a certain degree of importance because of scattered cases that have appeared in Army camps. A few cases have occurred in camps in this country, and in the British army the cases have been more numerous. Usually it is possible to trace the infection to contaminated shaving brushes. The occurrence of two cases in Camp Jackson within a very short period of each other, the first reported from this camp, appears worthy of record, especially in view of the fact that the first case was so atypical clinically that the nature of the condition could not be suspected without the laboratory findings.

REPORTS OF CASES 

Case 1.—Clinical Course.  —A private of the One Hundred and Fifty-Sixth Depot Brigade, white, aged 23, was admitted to the base hospital, July 17, 1918. The family and previous

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