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Article
November 23, 1918

MULTIPLE INFECTIONSA STUDY OF THE RELATION OF ONE INFECTION TO ANOTHER

Author Affiliations

Physician Attached to the American Red Cross FRANCE

JAMA. 1918;71(21):1703-1706. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600470001001
Abstract

It is generally recognized that when a person has one or more infectious diseases, one may influence the other occasionally to the apparent advantage of the patient, but more frequently to his disadvantage. In other words, increased susceptibility to one organism may result from infection with another. This subject has been dealt with in the literature under such titles as mixed infection, metastatic infection, secondary infection and focal infection. It may be illustrated by familiar clinical examples. It is well known, for instance, that latent tuberculosis may become active and rapidly progressive after an attack of tonsillitis, measles or pneumonia. Osler mentions the fact that quiescent maladies, such as congenital syphilis and tuberculosis, may be lighted into activity by vaccination. Urethritis or chronic prostatitis is often unfavorably influenced by the onset of a new infection. Urethritis that is apparently cured may occasionally recur after an attack of tonsillitis, bronchitis or

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