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December 21, 1918

CITRATED BLOOD IN TREATMENT OF THE PNEUMONIA FOLLOWING INFLUENZARESULTSOF THE USE OF BLOOD FROM CONVALESCENT INFLUENZA PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; PITTSBURGH

From the Mercy Hospital.

JAMA. 1918;71(25):2053-2055. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600510021008
Abstract

The early days of the epidemic with its fatal and clinically somewhat atypical pneumonia are far from pleasant memories. Any measure, therefore, that gave us a better chance to combat this infection was most opportune. McGuire and Redden1 treated thirty-seven pneumonia patients with thirty recoveries, six still under treatment and one death, by using the blood serum intravenously, taken from influenza patients that had recovered. They used from 300 to 700 c.c., as was indicated. This meant, of course, that large amounts of blood had to be taken from the donors, up to 800 c.c. of blood being withdrawn from one individual. They noticed that the serum appeared to vary in the amount of immune substance that it was supposed to contain. In fact, ten out of seventy serums clinically failed to demonstrate any evidence of this. Brown and Sweet2 referred to the use of citrated blood in

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