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December 21, 1918

THE UTILIZATION OF CALCIUM AND SOME OTHER ELEMENTS IN CERTAIN VEGETABLES

JAMA. 1918;71(25):2076-2077. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600510044015
Abstract

"It is not difficult," the Food Guide of the United States Food Administration tells us, "to understand why vegetables and fruits are so important. Only a few are especially valuable as fuel or as a source of protein, but almost all are high in mineral salts and can supply the 'roughage' desirable in the diet. Some also contain the vitamins, the leafy vegetables being especially valuable because, like milk, they contain the two kinds. The 'green,' leafy vegetables, like spinach, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, asparagus and lettuce, are the ones that help most in these last ways—'protective foods,' they have been called. They are rich in the iron, calcium and other minerals that some of the other foods lack. The use of plenty of these vegetables should go far toward keeping up health."1

Hasty generalizations of this sort, helpful as they may be, are liable to include much that is

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