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Article
December 28, 1918

THE EFFECT OF "GROUND GLASS" ON THE GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT OF DOGS

Author Affiliations

Major, M. C., U. S. Army; First Lieutenant, M. R. C., U. S. Army FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS

JAMA. 1918;71(26):2127-2128. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600520013006

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Abstract

During the past few months quite a number of food specimens have been received at the Southern Department Laboratory, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, with requests for examination to determine the presence of "ground glass."

Of 120 specimens of different kinds, glass was found in the following samples: cakes, 2; cottonseed hulls, 5; jelly, 1; milk, 1; prepared mustard, 1; peanut butter, 1; sliced beef, 1, and sugar, 1.

The glass found in many of these specimens was small in size and amount, and could have been accidental. Some few samples of food in closed non-sealed containers, however, showed many large pieces of broken glass, which, apparently, had been placed there purposely by those sending in the specimens.

Many reports of so-called "glass poisoning" were made by newspapers and individuals, and the subject was discussed in a number of medical journals throughout the country, but we have not been able to

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