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Article
December 28, 1918

ISOLATION OF INFLUENZA BACILLUS FROM THE BLOODREPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

(Memphis, Tenn.) First Lieutenant, M. C., U. S. Army; Chief of the Laboratory Service, Base Hospital No. 106, A. E. F. FRANCE

JAMA. 1918;71(26):2137-2138. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020520006010a

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Abstract

Case 1.—Clinical History.  —The patient was admitted to the hospital, Sept. 27, 1918, two days after the onset of influenza with headache and aching all over. The patient had a cough, but no bloody sputum. The bowels had not moved for two days. The throat was very red. There were a few sibilant râles in the right axilla and anteriorly.September 29, the temperature was elevated, the pulse rapid, and the entire chest full of large, moist râles. The condition was diagnosed as bronchopneumonia.September 30, the patient was very much prostrated, the skin dry and harsh. Respiration was markedly increased with almost complete absence of breath sounds over the right middle and lower lobes. There was increased voice fremitus. There was flatness on percussion. There were no râles. The diagnosis was lobar pneumonia.October 1, the pulse was 124 and rather weak; there was marked elevation of temperature.

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