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Article
March 8, 1919

VACCINATION OF TUBERCULOUS PATIENTS AGAINST SMALLPOX.RESULTS IN TWO HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

MOUNT VERNON, OHIO

JAMA. 1919;72(10):704. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610100012004

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Abstract

A review of the small amount of literature on the subject of vaccination against smallpox of tuberculous patients and personal consultation with several men of authority reveal the fact that it is apparently a matter of common agreement that vaccination should not be done unless it is extremely necessary for the safety and welfare of the patient.

The results obtained in compulsory vaccination of about 200 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis seem strongly to contradict this idea.

The reason for the compulsory vaccination was that a virulent case of smallpox broke out in the institution and the patient had been mingling with all the other patients for about ten days prior to the time of the eruption and the making of the diagnosis.

REPORT OF CASE  W. Mc., man, aged 34, white, admitted, Aug. 2, 1918, with the ordinary history of a tuberculous breakdown, was well nourished and was only 5

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