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Article
March 8, 1919

POSTMORTEM CESAREAN SECTION FOLLOWING AN INFLUENZAL BRONCHOPNEUMONIASUCCESSFUL DELIVERY OF A LIVING CHILD

Author Affiliations

Resident Surgeon, San Francisco Hospital SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1919;72(10):727. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610100035016

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Abstract

The conditions most frequently calling for a postmortem cesarean section are the sudden death of the mother from traumatism, hemorrhage or eclampsia. In the case in hand, death was the result of a bronchopneumonia following influenza.

At first glance it would appear that a number of abdominal sections might have been done during the recent pandemic of influenza; but as I look back over the records of the San Francisco Hospital, in which, during the past four months, we have handled 108 cases of influenza complicated with pregnancy, I find that in only one case was it thought advisable to do a cesarean section. Thus we find the percentage rather small.

REPORT OF CASE  Nov. 9, 1918, Mrs. L. A., aged 24, was admitted to the hospital, in her third labor. Both her last children are living. She was a woman of about 150 pounds, having done the usual housework.

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