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Article
December 27, 1919

CEREBRAL GAS EMBOLISM OCCURRING DURING ADMINISTRATION OF ARTIFICIAL PNEUMOTHORAX

Author Affiliations

Mount Vernon, Ohio

JAMA. 1919;73(26):1936-1937. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.26120520002014b

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Abstract

History.  —W. W., aged 37, white, machinist, native of Scotland, who had been in the United States four years, was admitted to the Ohio State Sanatorium for Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis, May 27, 1918, and his condition classified as moderately advanced (Turban II). He gave a history of having had tuberculosis ten years before, with several pulmonary hemorrhages at that time. He had recovered with no recurrence until April 1, 1918, when he developed a heavy cold which persisted. On admission he weighed 166 pounds, which was normal. He was 5 feet, 5 inches tall, stockily built, had a short, thick neck, and was of the typical apoplectic type.

Examination.  —The sputum was positive for tubercle bacilli, May 31, July 23 and Dec. 10, 1918, and Jan. 4, 1919. The urine was negative on several different examinations. August 17, the sputum was streaked. On admission, the temperature ranged from normal to

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