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Article
January 10, 1920

PARIS

JAMA. 1920;74(2):117-118. doi:10.1001/jama.1920.02620020049026

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Abstract

Important Modifications of Disability Pensions  In a former letter (The Journal, May 17, 1919, p. 1479), I reported certain increases in military pensions. Since then a number of worth-while reforms in the military pension system have been introduced. For example, as regards the furnishing of proof that the wound or the disease in question was actually contracted in the service, the new law establishes the "presumption of origin" in favor of applicants for pension. This applies not only to the term of actual service but, if it is a question of disease, also to the six months following the demobilization. It suffices, in order to take advantage of the presumption of origin, that the applicant shall have made, within the time limit of six months, written application to the regional director of the army medical department. The burden of proof as to whether the wound or the disease in question

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