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Article
February 21, 1920

PHYSICAL AND HYGIENIC BENEFITS OF MILITARY TRAINING AS DEMONSTRATED BY THE WAR

Author Affiliations

Surgeon-General, U. S. Army WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1920;74(8):499-501. doi:10.1001/jama.1920.02620080001001

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Abstract

Probably no other class of men have the vision, as medical men have, to see the good that would result from universal military training.

There never has been a real survey of the man power of the United States, but all of us know that many surprising facts would be developed if such a survey were made. The Civil War gave a certain indefinite survey at that time, but during the last fifty-five years tremendous changes have taken place in our mode of living, and the human mechanism has not adjusted itself to the changes of civilization. We have had no opportunity to judge the defects among our male population. For a long time the finger of scorn has been pointed at the Army and Navy because we had such a high percentage of venereal disease. I have been interested in this subject for a quarter of a century. The

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